Bob Lanier

Article

May 23, 2022

Robert Jerry "Bob" Lanier, Jr. (Buffalo, New York, September 10, 1948 – May 10, 2022)[1] was an American professional basketball player who played fourteen seasons in the NBA. At 2.11 meters tall, he played in the pivot position.

Race

Institute

He attended Buffalo's Bennett High School until his graduation in 1966, and St. Bonaventure University, Olean, New York.

University

He played three seasons with the Bonnies, where he was selected three times for the Converse All-America (1968-1970), and in 1970 he led the University of St. Bonaventure to the NCAA Final Four, however, he arrived injured and could not play. the semifinal game against Artis Gilmore's Jacksonville, where they were eliminated.

Professional

He was selected in the first position of the 1970 Draft by the Detroit Pistons, being named that season in the quintet of the best rookies of the campaign. During his tenth season with the Pistons, on February 4, 1980, he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks for Kent Benson. In his nearly five seasons on the team, he won the division championship each year. On September 24, 1984 he retired from professional basketball, after 14 seasons in the league, he averaged 20.1 points and 10.1 rebounds per game with a respectable 51.4% shooting from the field. He played in 8 All-Star Games and was named the game's MVP in 1974.

Withdrawal

He subsequently entered the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992, [2] and his #16 jersey was retired by both the Pistons and Bucks. In the 1994-95 season, as an assistant coach at the Golden State Warriors, he became interim coach for 37 games replacing Don Nelson, posting a 12-25 record.[3] He entered the St. Bonaventure Athletics Hall of Fame in 1975, [4] and his #31 bib was retired.[4] He was a world ambassador for the NBA after his retirement and chairman of a league-backed initiative that encouraged kids to stay in school.[5]

Statistics of his career in the NBA

Regular Season

Playoffs

Personal Life

[update] He died on May 10, 2022, at the age of 73, after a brief illness.[6][5]

References

External Links

Bob Lanier stats at NBA.com Bob Lanier stats at Basketball-Reference.com Bob Lanier Hall of Fame Bio