The Adventures of Tintin

Article

November 30, 2021

The Adventures of Tintin is a series of comics created by the Belgian designer and screenwriter Hergé. With 250 million copies sold, Les Aventures de Tintin is one of the most famous and popular European comics of the 20th century. They have been translated into a hundred languages ​​and dialects and have been adapted many times for cinema, television and the theater. They take place in a realistic and sometimes fantastic universe, teeming with characters with well-defined character traits. The hero of the series is the eponymous character, Tintin, a young Belgian reporter and globetrotter; he is accompanied in his adventures by his fox terrier Snowy. Over the albums, several recurring figures appear, such as the detectives accumulating the wacky clumsy Dupond and Dupont, Captain Haddock who soon becomes a main character, or even Professor Tournesol. The series is appreciated for its drawings which mix characters of exaggerated proportions and realistic settings. The use of lines of equal thickness, the absence of hatching and the use of solid areas of color are the hallmarks of the author's style, known as the "light line". The intrigues of the albums mix genres: adventures on the other side of the world, police investigations, spy stories, science fiction, fantasy. The stories told in The Adventures of Tintin always give pride of place to “banana peel” humor, counterbalanced in the later albums by a certain irony and a reflection on society.

Publications

The Adventures of Tintin were published for the first time on January 10, 1929 in Le Petit Vingtième, a weekly children's supplement to the Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle. The last publication in this newspaper dates from May 9, 1940 - the day when the German armies entered Belgium. From October 26, 1930, the series was also published in Cœurs vaillants, a French Catholic weekly. From September 3, 1932, it was also published, with some modifications, in the Swiss Catholic weekly L’Écho Illustré. From October 17, 1940, the publication of the Adventures of Tintin resumed in Le Soir jeunesse, a supplement to the daily Le Soir. Hergé begins there The Crab with the Golden Claws. From September 23, 1941, following the stopping of the publication of Soir jeunesse, a consequence of paper rationing, the publication of the Adventures of Tintin was directly integrated into the pages of the newspaper Le Soir. This publication will continue there until September 1, 1944, when the liberation of Belgium begins. From September 26, 1946, after a period of publication ban, The Adventures of Tintin were pre-published in the Journal de Tintin with Le Temple du Soleil. The Adventures of Tintin are also published in 24 albums, including an unfinished one, by Casterman editions. They end with the death of their author on March 3, 1983.

History of the series

Birth of the character (1929-1930)

In September 1925, Hergé joined the subscription service for the Vingtième Siècle, a resolutely Catholic and conservative daily. At the same time, he continued to publish his own drawings in Le Boy-Scout, and in particular his first comic strip, Les Aventures de Totor, C. P. des Hannetons, from July 1926. From August 1927, at the end of his military service, he was promoted to the Twentieth Century and then worked as a reporter-photographer and designer. The following year, the director of the newspaper Norbert Wallez entrusted him with the writing of a weekly supplement intended for young people, Le Petit Vingtième, the first number of which appeared on November 1, 1928.

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