Empress Farah of Iran

Article

October 25, 2021

Farah (Tehran, October 14, 1938 -), born Farah Diba, Persian: فرح دیبا, third wife of Iranian Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, First Empress of Iran. In 1966 and 1978, she and her husband also paid an official visit to Hungary. He was born in Tehran as Farah Diba, the only child of his parents. He had lost his father as a child. Through his father, his family came from a province in Iran called Azerbaijan. The surname Diba means silk, which comes from the fact that one of their ancestors used to dress in silk clothes. He also held the title of Sejjed, as he was also a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad through his daughter, Fatima. In today’s Republic of Azerbaijan, the origins of the Iranian Empress were recorded. He completed his postgraduate studies in Paris, at the École Spéciale d'Architecture College of Architecture, where he only got into his second year because he intervened in big politics. The shah's interest in his son-in-law, Ardesir Zahedi, aroused the Parisian female student. Zahedi invited Miss Diba to tea, where he was hosted by his wife, the only child of the shah at the time, Princess Sahnaz, two years younger than the later empress. The shah was already a fresh and young grandfather at the time and was only 40 years old. A cordial relationship developed between Farah and Princess Sahnaz, and there has always been a good relationship between the Empress and her “stepdaughter”. The Shah and Farah were married on December 21, 1959. On March 20, 1961, her husband bestowed on her the title of “sahanánu (Empress), and at their joint coronation on October 26, 1967, the shah first crowned herself and then placed the crown on the Empress’s head. As the shah’s wife, Farah supported the Iranian arts. He has organized a number of events, the best known of which is the Shiraz Art Festival, held in 1967. The Empress also sponsored several museums and played a major role in repurchasing Iranian artefacts abroad. His language skills were also unmatched and he loved learning languages. In addition to Persian, he spoke French on a native level, but learned English, and when they were already in exile in Mexico, he also began to learn Spanish. He also understood Russian well. She followed her husband into exile on January 16, 1979, when the Mullahs took power in Iran. She fled to Egypt with her family, and after Mohammed Reza shah died on July 27, 1980, Empress Farah and her children spent nearly two more years in Egypt. After the assassination of Egyptian President Anvar Sadat, the Sahi family settled in Williamston, Massachusetts, and later moved to Greenwich, Connecticut. The Empress bought her house in Potomac, Maryland, after the younger daughter of her younger daughter, Lejla, in 2001, to be closer to her son in Washington. His memoirs were issued in 2003. She lost two of her four children as her younger son, Ali Reza Pahlavi, also committed suicide on 4 January 2011 after the death of her younger daughter. Today, he is one of the most active supporters of Iranian royalists.

Origin

His father was Sohrab Diba (1901–1947), whose family came from a province in Iran called Azerbaijan. The surname Diba means silk, which comes from the fact that one of their ancestors used to dress in silk clothes. He also held the title of Sejjed, as he was also a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad through his daughter, Fatima. "And the priests said, when they knew that I was Sejed, a descendant of the Prophet: the king became the prophet's son by marrying me." His paternal grandfather was a diplomat in the Netherlands and in Tbilisi, then part of Tsarist Russia, who spoke Russian, French and H in his mother tongue outside Persian.

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