Open content

Article

October 25, 2021

The term open content, like open source, describes creative works (such as articles, images, audio, and motion pictures) that are published under non-restrictive copyright terms (licenses) and in a form that expressly permits copying of the information. (An example is the GNU Free Documentation License, which is also used by Wikipedia and Nupedia.) The term “open content” is also often used to describe content that can be modified by anyone. More recently, however, the more precise term “freely editable” or “freely editable” has spread to this. Of course, this does not mean that anyone can write anything (such as an offense), but that there is no pre-defined closed group - such as the publisher of a lexicon - who is responsible for all editing. Just as open source is often referred to simply as free software (not to be confused with freeware), open source content is also referred to as free / open source material for short. However, not all open content is “free” following the interpretation of the GNU GPL (such as the Mozilla Open Directory). See also articles on the public domain and the free software movement.

The essence of open content

Open content (or free content) is generally not free (i.e., free to use) with which it is often confused. Free use legally means only that the owner of a work (content) allows him to view the work in the manner specified by him, in a circle specified by him, at a time specified by him, free of charge, or to perform other activities related to the work (e.g. you can perform or create a collection from it, for example, in your yearbook). However, the work remains the property of the author (or copyright holder) and he may change his license to use it in any way at any time. In the case of open content, the author (rightholder) makes a statement that allows the use of the work in an irrevocable manner so that it is available to the widest possible audience and allows the widest possible uses; these disclaimers are called a usage contract or license, which specifies the terms of use, any restrictions. Copyright distinguishes between the following uses: getting to know the work (reading, viewing, listening, etc.), duplication of the work (copying), distribution of the work (performance, publication, distribution), reworking of the work (amendment, creation of a "derivative work"), In the case of "genuine" free content, the license is available to everyone (whether individual, company or other legal or non-legal entity) for all uses (based on the above, regardless of the purpose of use, ie even private, for educational or commercial purposes) and may include specific restrictions (for example, to ensure that new copyrighted works , patents or personal rights that may restrict use beyond copyright). There are uses that cannot be considered completely “free content” because they contain restrictions compared to the above: they restrict the range of users (e.g., prohibiting commercial use) or uses (e.g., prohibiting

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