Dmitry Muratov

Article

October 20, 2021

Dmitry Andreevič Muratov (Kujbyšev, 30 October 1961) is a Russian journalist, editor of Novaya Gazeta and winner of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize together with Maria Ressa. He is a member of the Jabloko party.

Biography

A student of philology for five years at the Kujbyšev State University, he developed his interest in journalism here. During his university years, he came into contact with local newspapers by doing part-time jobs in the sector. After graduation, from 1983 to 1985, he served in the Soviet Army specializing in the security of communications equipment. In 1987 he took on the post of correspondent for Volžsky Komsomolets, causing a favorable impression in the superiors, who appointed him head of the Komsomolskaya Pravda youth sector and later editor. He left this newspaper in 1988.

Novaya Gazeta

In 1993, Muratov and 50 other colleagues from Komsomolskaya Pravda founded their own newspaper called Novaya Gazeta. Muratov was appointed deputy director. Their goal was to create a publication that was "an honest, independent and rich source" for Russian citizens. The newspaper's mission was to conduct in-depth investigations into issues relating to human rights, corruption and abuse of power. The Novaya Gazeta editorial team started with two computers, two rooms, a printer, and no salary for employees. Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev generously donated part of his Nobel Peace Prize to pay salaries and computers for the newspaper. In December 1994-January 1995, Muratov was a correspondent in the war zone of the First Chechen War. In 1995 he became director, a position he held until 2017, when he said he would not be running for re-election. Instead, in 2019, Muratov was re-elected to the post. Novaya Gazeta is known as one of the "few truly critical newspapers with national influence in Russia today" by the Journalist Protection Committee. Muratov has frequently reported on sensitive topics including human rights violations, high-level government corruption, and abuse of power. His political beliefs, such as support for press freedom, have led to conflicts with fellow journalists and the government. In 2004, the newspaper published seven articles by columnist Georgy Rozhnov, who accused Sergey Kiriyenko of unduly obtaining $ 4.8 billion in IMF funds in 1998, when he was Prime Minister of Russia. The newspaper based the allegations on a letter allegedly written to Colin Powell and signed by US Congressmen Philip Crane, Mike Pence, Charlie Norwood, Dan Burton and Henry Bonilla and posted on the American Defense Council website. The newspaper claimed that Kiriyenko had used some of the stolen funds to buy real estate in the United States. It was later claimed that the letter was a joke invented by The eXile. In response, Kiriyenko sued Novaya Gazeta and Rozhnov for defamation, and in ruling in Kiriyenko's favor the court ordered Novaya Gazeta to withdraw all publications relating to the allegations. After Novaya Gazeta published an investigation by journalist Denis Korotkov on A Russian businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin, linked to the Kremlin, in October 2018, Denis Korotkov and the newspaper's editor-in-chief were the target of menacing deliveries of a severed ram's head and funeral flowers to the newspaper's offices. published reports on anti-gay purges in Chechnya in 2017, where three men were allegedly killed and dozens detained and intimidated. After publication, the Chechen government denied the existence of persecutions in the Republic. The newspaper published the report by Elena Milashina and the list of the 27 Chechens killed on January 26, 2017. The newspaper also

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