Eleonora d'Arborea

Article

January 24, 2022

Eleonora or Elianora d'Arborea (Molins de Rei, about 1347 - Sardinia, June 1403), was judged of Arborea, also known for the updating of the Carta de Logu, promulgated by her father Mariano IV and revisited by her older brother Ugone III . The Aragonese, successive rulers of Sardinia, extended the territorial scope of application of the Carta de Logu to almost the entire island. The legislation remained in force for centuries, until it was replaced by the code of Carlo Felice di Savoia (April 16, 1827), now on the threshold of the perfect fusion with the Savoy mainland and the Risorgimento. The symbolic meaning that is locally attributed to the figure and to the regency of Eleonora is highlighted by the fact that the Giudicato of Arborea was the last native Sardinian state to be ceded to rulers outside the island. This means that, especially in the context of Sardinian independence, she is often seen as the main national heroine of Sardinia, together with Giovanni Maria Angioy.

Biography

Early Years

Eleonora was born in Molins de Rei (Catalonia, Kingdom of Aragon), around 1347, to Mariano IV dei de Serra Bas and the Catalan noblewoman Timbora di Roccaberti, daughter of Viscount Dalmazio. Her sister of Ugone and her Beatrice, she lived the first years of her youth in Oristano and in the castle of Goceano. When judge Pietro III of Arborea died without descendants in 1347, the Corona de Logu del Giudicato (an assembly of notables, prelates, city and village officials) elected the father of Eleonora Mariano IV, brother of the deceased, who ruled the judged from 1347 to 1376.

Dynastic relations

Eleonora married before 1376 the forty-year-old Brancaleone Doria, of the influential Genoese family. Her marriage was part of the more general design of an alliance between the Arborea and the Dorias, who already controlled vast territories of Sardinia in an anti-Aragonese function. After the wedding, she lived in Castelgenovese (now Castelsardo), where her children Federico and Mariano are said to have been born, and in Genoa. It now seems certain that in 1382 Eleonora gave a loan of 4,000 gold florins to Nicolò Guarco, doge of the Republic of Genoa, and that he undertook to repay the sum on her part within ten years; otherwise, he would have paid double. Accessory, the condition was signed that, if in the meantime Federico (Eleonora's eldest son) had reached puberty, the daughter of Doge Bianchina would have had to marry him and, in the event that this marriage could not be celebrated (due to death or other fortuitous event ), the deed would become null and void. A similar loan to a powerful family of Genoa, and this clause of the contract, indicate a dynastic design by Eleonora who, by granting this credit, together kept the prestige of her lineage high and recognized the importance of the Ligurian interests. In addition, she laid the foundations for an alliance that would allow her to have recourse to logistical and connection resources (through the powerful Dorian fleet) in most of the Mediterranean ports. In essence, you entered the game of European politics on an equal footing. The murder in 1383 of her brother Ugone III and her daughter Benedetta immediately posed problems of succession. This sudden and violent death could have various reasons and could benefit various interests. The claimants to the Arborean throne were the children of the late judge's sisters, Beatrice and Eleonora. But Beatrice had died in 1377 and her heir, far away. Eleonora closer and more present than her worked hard to ensure the election by the Corona de Logu of her to her very young son. Recent studies (see entry Mariano IV, in "Biographical Dictionary of Italians", vol. 70/2007), based on a letter from Aimerico VI of Narbonne, husband of Beatrice, to King Peter IV of Aragon, in which he claimed the arborense throne for his son William II (Royal Archives of Barcellon

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