Machismo

Article

January 24, 2022

For machismo (from the Spanish macho, meaning male) we mean a display of virility due to the belief that the male is superior to the female. The term, which has spread since the beginning of the early twentieth century, translates into the male's need to excessively show his own qualities such as tolerance to pain and in the control and repression of women. Machismo has also been absorbed into the arts, such as film and literature, with male representations showing off their manhood to prove their worth in difficult situations.

Origins

Machismo was part of homosexuality in ancient Greece and was not necessarily related to misogyny. Goddesses were worshiped in temples and the poet Sappho wrote about lesbian love. In ancient times, women also had their share of machismo-like vices and virtues. The Amazon tradition tells of women who fought heroically as defenders in the Trojan War and, according to National Geographic, "archeology shows that these ferocious women also smoked weed, got tattoos, killed and loved men." Homosexual machismo helped counter Sparta's power over ancient Greek city-states: in 371 BC. the sacred battalion of Thebes was an elite fighting unit made up of 150 homosexual male couples. They were credited with having helped to remove the military rule of Sparta and their actions were linked to the spread of Western culture: the Theban general Epaminondas taught Philip II of Macedon the military tactics and diplomacy used to reunify the Greeks under Macedonia. His son Alexander the Great was credited with the Hellenization of Persia, Egypt and Jerusalem in 332 BC. The Greeks had the Hebrew scriptures translated into the Version of the Seventy, favoring the spread of Judaism throughout the region. Alexander and Hephaestion had been heavily influenced by Homer's Iliad, particularly the male love between Achilles and Patroclus. They mated as their modern incarnation, nearly a millennium after the Trojan War. Later, the Roman Empire shared a certain degree of homosexuality alongside the virtues of masculinity. In 19 BC, Virgil's epic "Aeneid" contributed to the folklore of Rome, while describing the love of fellow warriors Nysus and Euryalus. In 128 A.D. the love of the emperor Hadrian and Antinous was publicly celebrated. Back in Jewish culture, in 1006 BC, the pact between David and Jonathan was recorded in the Books of Samuel. Gradually, the Version of the Seventy would be expanded with new Greek books, eventually forming Christian Bibles. The earliest extant versions are the Codex Vaticanus and the Codex Sinaiticus of 300-360 AD.

Features

Positive aspects

In the traditional household, a man is expected to work and provide for his family while his wife stays at home to take care of the children. As such, fathers are seen as a distant authority figure for their children, while mothers take on most of the responsibility in this domestic realm and thus earn the free will and ultimate respect of their children. As female power increases, decisions in the family can take a more egalitarian approach, in which mothers can have the same say. At the same time, the macho mentality in men as suppliers and protectors of the family can motivate them to persevere through the challenges introduced by work. "Within each of our memories is the image of a father who worked long hours, suffered to keep his family alive, united and who fought to keep his dignity. Such a man had little. time to worry about her “masculinity.” She certainly didn't have ten children to cause

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