Orders of magnitude (data)

Article

January 24, 2022

This table compares the various orders of magnitude for the data (or information) measured in bits. To facilitate reading, we have chosen to call the 8-bit groups with the more practical and widespread term of bytes. However, it must be remembered that this is not formally correct and that the correct name to use for an 8-bit group should be octet, this is because in some computer architectures a byte is not equal to 8 bits.

1 bit

1 bit - zero "0" or one "1" 3 bits - Are needed to represent a digit in the octal number system 4 bit - A half octet or nibble. The minimum size to represent a digit in hexadecimal. 5 bit - Size of the Baudot coding system used in teletype communications. 6 bit - Size of the Braille coding system a tactile reading / writing system used by the blind. 7 bit - Size of the ASCII encoding system used to represent characters in computers. 8 bit - An octet of bit, which is a byte used in many (but not all) computer architectures.

10 bit

(tens of bits) 16-bit - Programming languages ​​are used to represent integers. With 16 bits, 65 536 different values ​​can be represented. 16 bit - The "word size" (length of instructions) for various "second generation" console systems, for example: Super Nintendo, Sega Genesis 32 bit - Integer format with which 4 294 967 296 different values ​​can be represented. 32-bit - Size of a single-precision floating point number in the IEEE 754 standard. 32 bits - Size of an IPv4 address, which is the Internet Protocol in use today. 56 bits - out of an overall 64-bit key, they are actually used by the Data Encryption Standard (DES) encryption system algorithm. 64 bits - Integer format with which 18 446 744 073 709 552 000 different values ​​can be represented. 64-bit - Used in the IEEE 754 standard to represent double-precision floating point numbers.

102 bits

(100 bits; hundreds of bits;) 128 bit - Size of an IPv6 address, the new Internet Protocol now in an advanced stage of experimentation. 128 bit - Minimum size of keys in cryptographic algorithms of the Rijndael and AES standards.

103 bits

(1 000 bits; 1 kilobit; thousands bits;) 1024 bit - 1 kibibit or 210 bit 8000 bits - 1 kilobyte or 103 bytes 8192 bits - 1 kibibyte or 213 bits or 210 bytes

104 bits

(10 000 bits; tens of thousands of bits)

105 bits

(100 000 bits; hundreds of thousands of bits)

106 bits

(1 000 000 bits; 1 Megabit; millions of bits;) 1 048 576 bit (220 bit) - 1 mebibit. 8 000 000 bits (106 bytes) - 1 megabyte. 8 388 608 bits (223 bits, 220 octets) - 1 mebibyte.

107 bits

(10 000 000 bits; tens of millions of bits;) 11 796 480 bits - Capacity of a 3.5 "floppy disk, colloquially known as 1.44 megabytes but actually defined as 1.44 × 1000 × 1024 bytes. 25,000,000 bits - Number of data in a normal color image. 25 964 951 bits - Size of the largest known Mersenne prime until February 2005, all 25 964 951 bits that make it up are 1. 50-100 megabits - The amount of information contained in a normal telephone directory.

108 bits

(100,000,000 bits; hundreds of millions of bits;) 150,000,000 bits - This is the amount of information in a large foldout map.

109 bits

(1 000 000 000 bits; 1 Gigabit; billions of bits;) 1 073 741 824 bit (230 bit) - 1 gibibit. 5.45 × 109 bits (650 mebibytes) - The capacity of a regular compact disc. 6.4 × 109 bits - The capacity of the human genome, approximately 3.2 billion pairs. 8 000 000 000 bits (109 bytes) - 1 gigabyte. 8 589 934 592 bits (233 bits or 230 bytes) - 1 gibibyte.

1010 bits

(10 000 000 000 bits; tens of billions of bits)

1011 bits

(100,000,000,000 bits; ce

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