Coorong National Park

Article

July 5, 2022

Coorong National Park is a protected area in South Australia, located about 156km south-east of Adelaide, mainly comprising the coastal lagoon ecosystem known officially as Coorong and the Younghusband peninsula jutting out from the southern side of the park. The western end of the Coorong Lagoon is located at the mouth of the Murray near Hindmarsh Island and the Sir Richard Peninsula, and extends approximately 130km to the southeast. Road access to the park is located in Meningie. The beach that stretches along the coastal side of the peninsula, Australia's longest, is also commonly known as Coorong. The Coorong stands on an area originally inhabited by the Ngarrindjeri aborigines. Notable locations in the park include Salt Creek, Policeman's Point, Jack Point and Woods Well.

Etymology

The name is believed to be a corruption of the word ngarrindjeri kurangk or kurangh, which meant a long, narrow lagoon.

History

Coorong National Park was established on November 9, 1967 under the National Parks Act 1966 on land located in Sectors 17 and 60 of the Glyde Centena Cadastral Unit and in Sector 6 of Santo Centena. and Wildlife Act 1972, April 27, 1972, the national park consisted of land located in Sectors 17, 59 and 60 of the Glyde Rib Cadastral Unit and in Sectors 6, 43 and 52 of the Santo Rib. , which had been bought by the South Australian government in 1968, was abolished on 14 January 1993 and its land was added to the national park. The game reserve occupied part of the Coorong lagoon just west of Salt Creek and covered an area of ​​68.4 km² in May 1982. In February 2013, a lifeboat from the MS Oliva, a ship that sank in the Atlantic southern in 2011, she ended up on a beach in the national park.

Geography

The western end of the Coorong Lagoon is located at the mouth of the Murray near Hindmarsh Island and the Sir Richard Peninsula, and extends approximately 130 kilometers to the southeast. The park area includes Coorong itself and the Younghusband Peninsula which separates the Coorong from the St Vincent Gulf in the Southern Ocean. The connection between the Coorong and Lake Alexandrina was interrupted by the construction of the Goolwa barrages, between Goolwa and Pelican, in the late 1930s. The national park was established in 1967 as a sanctuary for many species of birds, other animals and fish. It attracts many migratory species, providing them with a refuge during the droughts that regularly hit Australia. The 467 km² of the park includes systems of coastal dunes, lagoons and coastal vegetation.One of the unique aspects of the Coorong is the constant presence of water in all its forms, whether it is salty like that of the sea or sweet like that of the Murray River. without neglecting that brought about by atmospheric precipitations and present in the aquifers. Fresh water provides sustenance for the region's fauna, while marine waters make up the habitat of much of the bird life. Notable places within the park are Salt Creek, Policeman's Point, Jack Point and Woods Well. del Coorong are a popular destination for anglers, both amateur and commercial. Mainly yellow-eyed mullets (Aldrichetta forsteri), Japanese croaker (Argyrosomus japonicus) and various sparidae of the genus Acanthopagrus are caught here.

Beach

The 194km long sandy beach that runs along the outer side of the Younghusband Peninsula and commonly referred to as Coorong is Australia's longest beach. It extends from the mouth of the Murray to Cape Jaffa.

Cultural importance

The Coorong is of great cultural importance p