ancient folk house

Article

July 5, 2022

Kominka is one of the similar examples of Japanese houses. A private house that has been built for a long time.

Overview

The definition of an old folk house does not define when it was built or how many years it was built, but it usually refers to prewar ones, especially prewar ones. .. In addition, the building method often identifies buildings built in traditional Japanese architecture that does not use nails. In Japan these days, the rationality and durability of these traditional frame construction methods are being reviewed, and many attempts are being made to regenerate old folk houses that are on the verge of being demolished. In the background, awareness of issues such as the loss of traditional streets, environmental issues, and the identity of the Japanese has finally sprung up in the Japanese. There is a specified non-profit organization (certified NPO corporation) "Japan Private House Revitalization Association" to promote efforts to reuse the old private house itself, and the old private house is reused or damaged in houses and offices. We are promoting activities that emphasize the regeneration of earthquake-resistant reinforcements in places and enlightenment activities to help people understand the old folk house itself. There are many architectural styles of old folk houses depending on the purpose of use, time, region, climate, etc. There are houses such as houses, and you can also see special private houses such as the music houses found around the Tohoku region centering on Iwate Prefecture, and the multi-story gassho-zukuri found in Shirakawa-go and Gokayama. Originally, the roof is mainly thatched roof, but there are also thatched roofs. Recently, there are many things such as those with tin on top of them, and tiled roofs, tiled roofs, and tin roofs made by re-roofing. However, many buildings are being demolished due to aging and the aging of residents. The wood used in old folk houses is different from the easy method represented by the current house maker, so-called the right material is adopted in the right place, pine, chestnut, sugi etc. are used for the perishable part, and the beam is High-strength pine, wood with beautiful grain such as cedar, and materials with excellent humidity control effect are used properly for the interior. For this reason, it is designed to last for 200 to 300 years if maintenance is not neglected. The wood, which has been carefully smoked by the smoke in the hearth, changes to a tasteful color over time. In addition, the outside light is attenuated as it enters the interior of the room. Junichiro Tanizaki wrote in "In Praise of Shadows" that this production of light is familiar to Japanese aesthetics.

Main old folk houses

Hakogi House (Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture) --A national important cultural property, built in the late Muromachi period Furui Family Residence (Himeji City, Hyogo Prefecture) --A national important cultural property, built in the late Muromachi period Kuriyama Family Residence (Gojo City, Nara Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1607 Kobiga Family Residence (Takamatsu City, Kagawa Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built during the Keicho period Koma Family Residence (Hidaka City, Saitama Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built during the Keicho period Former Sugiyama Family Residence (Tondabayashi City, Osaka Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in the first half of the 17th century Yoshimura Family Residence (Habikino City, Osaka Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in the first half of the 17th century Imanishi Family Residence (Kashihara City, Nara Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1650 Former Ariji Family Residence (Mogami Town, Yamagata Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1661 Former Kihara Family Residence (Higashi-Hiroshima City, Hiroshima Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1665 Former Okada Residence (Itami City, Hyogo Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1674 Kawamoto Family Residence (Kotoura Town, Tottori Prefecture) --National Important Cultural Property, built in 1688 Yokooji Family Residence (Fuku.