Guinness Book of Records

Article

August 13, 2022

Guinness World Records - an annual guidebook published by Guinness, containing documented world records, both natural and human achievement.

About the Book

The book was initially intended to entertain with sensational and humorous information from beer hall regulars, and over time it became a prestigious publication in the world. He records record achievements in various fields, from the important to the trivial, such as "the largest portion of spaghetti eaten at one time". The title of the book is derived from the Irish Guinness family, brewers, owners of a Dublin brewery in the 19th century. Today, Guinness PLC, headquartered in London, has offices in 120 countries. Poland ranks second with 290 records. The first place goes to the USA - 315, and the third to Great Britain - 140 (as of January 25, 2018).

History

On May 4, 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, CEO of the Guinness Brewery, went to shoot the marshlands along the Slaney River in County Wexford, Ireland. Asking himself then about the fastest bird in Europe (golden plover or black grouse), he noticed that such information could not be verified in the textbooks of the time. Realizing that there are more similar questions in pubs in Ireland and Great Britain, Beaver realized that a book answering these types of questions could become popular. On August 27, 1955, the first edition of The Guinness Book of Records was released after the final data collection with the help of the McWhirter brothers (Norris McWhirter and Ross McWhirter) and their fact-finding agency. This edition had a circulation of 1,000 copies and in the same year the Book became a bestseller in Great Britain. A year later, it was also released in the United States in the number of 70 thousand. copies. The first Polish edition was published in 1991.

Earlier Book Names

The Guinness Book of World Records The Guinness Book of Records

See also

Ashrita Furman Society for the Control of Unusual Records

External Links

Polish Records and Guinness Records in Poland Official website of the Guinness Book of Records