Sleipner torpedo boats

Article

October 18, 2021

Sleipner torpedo boats - a series of Norwegian ships from World War II and the post-war period, consisting of six ships. Classified as destroyers, they actually corresponded to the torpedo class. From 1937, four ships entered the Norwegian navy in 1940. After the fall of Norway, two of the captured and two newly completed ships were incorporated into the German Kriegsmarine, while one, after escaping, operated from British ports. Five ships survived the war, after which they returned to the Norwegian Navy, reclassified as frigates. They were withdrawn from service by 1959.

History

During World War I, during which Norway remained neutral, and for a long time thereafter, the small Norwegian Navy did not order any further ships for financial and political reasons. It was not until the early 1930s that it was decided to build new destroyers, about 25 years after the previous Draug destroyers were constructed, which were from the beginning of the 20th century and were now completely obsolete. It was decided to build the smallest, and therefore the cheapest, ships possible, keeping the most powerful weapons possible. Therefore, the Sleipner type, although classified as a destroyer (Norwegian jager), actually corresponded to the size and characteristics of newly built torpedo boats in the world, and it is also often referred to in the literature. Despite the pause in the design of new ships, the Norwegians managed to design successful and original ships on their own, although their combat capabilities were limited by their size. To reduce the weight of the hull and engine room, a hull with a more modern longitudinal bond system, without a double bottom, and a boiler room with higher steam pressure were used. Despite its smaller size, the hull retained its division into numerous transverse watertight compartments. The destroyers were intended primarily to defend the Norwegian coast, but they had a considerable range. The keel for the construction of the prototype ship "Sleipner" was laid at the Main Naval Shipyard in Horten in 1933, the second ("Æger") the following year. Both were launched in 1936, when the construction of the third ship ("Gyller") began. The Sleipner first entered service in 1937, and two more in the next two years. After the first three ships were commissioned and built, construction of the next ones according to a modified design - also known as the Odin subtype - began in 1938. As it turned out that the desire to place strong weapons on small ships negatively affects their naval properties and stability, it was decided to relieve the ships of the second series by reducing the armament from three to two guns. Their hulls were also lengthened by 2 meters, which resulted in a slight increase in displacement. All ships were named after characters from Norse mythology (Sleipnir, Ägir, Odin, Thor, Baldur), except for "Gyller" (Polish shining). They were built in Horten, with the exception of the "Torah" built at the Mechanical Shipyard in Fredrikstad. Another type of Norwegian destroyers Aalesund were already enlarged ships, with a standard displacement of 1,220 tons and armed with four 120 mm guns, although they were based on the Sleipner type base. The construction of two ships began in 1939, but were not completed due to the outbreak of the war.

Ships

Main Source

Description

Architecture and construction

The standard displacement of the ships of the first series was 597 ts (tons), and the full displacement was 708 ts (719 metric tons). In the second series, the standard displacement increased to 635 ts. The length between the perpendiculars of the ships of the first series was 72 m, and the total length was 74.3 m, while in the case of the second series, these parameters were respectively 74 m and about 76 m. The hull width of both versions was 7.75 m, and the average draft was

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