Betty Davis

Article

July 5, 2022

Ruth Elizabeth "Bette" Davis (English: Ruth Elizabeth "Bette" Davis; Lowell, April 5, 1908 - Neji Sir Sen, October 6, 1989) was an American film, theater and television actress, often referred to as the First Lady of American film and one of the greatest movie divas of all time. She got her first film roles in the thirties, after several successful plays on Broadway. During her sixty-year career, she played over a hundred roles in films. She was sought after and appreciated for her willingness to play negative characters, and was so successful at it that films in which she played a bitch, as she herself said, were advertised under the slogan: "Who's better than evil Betty?". She was one of the few Hollywood divas who built a career solely thanks to her acting talent. In addition to her masterful roles, Davis was also known for her shy and self-centered nature. She was considered a belligerent and impetuous person due to her frequent opposition to directors and producers. At the very beginning of her career, she attracted the attention of film critics with her roles in the dramas Ljudski okovi, Pobeda nad tamom and Pismo. Already in the early forties of the 20th century, she was the most sought-after, highest-paid and most influential American movie star, with the cinematic and critical hit Little Fox behind her. The screenwriters reworked the script at her request, and the directors allowed her to change their decisions, only so that she would not leave the shooting, and continue to make blockbusters such as At the Crossroads and Mr. Skeffington. At the end of the forties, Betty's career stagnated, and in 1950, it began to rise again thanks to the role of Margot Channing in the cult film All About Eve. However, it was the peak of her career, after which her popularity declined again. Although she was already considered a fading star, she managed to attract public attention to herself twice again: the first time when she played the role of a psychopath in the thriller What Happened to Baby Jane? conquered the younger audience, and the second time as an eighty-year-old actress in the touching drama August whales. Davis, who was the first president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice — for her roles in 1935's Dangerous and 1937's Jezebel. Betty Davis is �