United Nations

Article

July 6, 2022

|official_name The United Nations (UN) is a global international organization founded on October 24, 1945 at a conference in San Francisco on the basis of the United Nations Charter. The declared purpose of the organization's activity is to maintain and strengthen peace and international security, and to develop cooperation between the world's states. The main bodies of the UN: the General Assembly (GA), the Security Council (RB), the Secretariat (the Secretary General is elected by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council for 5 years), the International Court of Justice, the Economic and Social Council; Board of Trustees; headquarters is located in New York. Founding members — 51 states (including the Ukrainian SSR). As of 1998, the UN had 185 member states. As of July 14, 2011, it has 193 member states. Western Sahara and other small states did not join the UN due to their non-recognition. The organization is financed by mandatory and voluntary contributions from its member states and uses six official languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish.

General Information

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization that seeks to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations between states, achieve international cooperation, and be a center for coordinating the actions of states. It is the largest, most common, most international and most powerful intergovernmental organization in the world. The headquarters of the United Nations is located internationally in New York, and its other main offices are located in Geneva, Nairobi, Vienna and The Hague. The organization's mission to maintain world peace was complicated in the first decades by the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union and their allies. Its missions consisted mainly of unarmed military observers and lightly armed forces, which performed mainly monitoring, reporting and confidence-building functions. UN membership has grown significantly since the large-scale decolonization that began in the 1960s. Since then, 80 former colonies have gained independence, including 11 trust territories controlled by the Trusteeship Council. By the 1970s, the UN's budget for economic and social development programs far exceeded its peacekeeping expenditures. After finishing